Category Archive Recommendations

Aberdeen Pubs and Bars 18: The Triple Kirks

The Triple Kirks

“Aberdeen’s TKs is one of the best-loved venues in the city, featuring just about everything you could possibly want or need from a pub under one roof. It’s actually a struggle to know where to begin! It’s the perfect place to eat, drink, meet friends, be entertained and get the best quality at the best prices.
– The best sporting action from Sky and BT Sport on our top quality HD screens.
– A huge range of beers (including nine five craft beer lines), spirits, ciders, wines, cocktails…put it this way, you want top quality drinks at reasonable prices, we got ’em!
– A kitchen serving great food, check out our menu on this site for details.”

Triple Kirks Website

Tripadvisor Review

Aberdeen Restaurants: Rusticos

Rusticos

“A warm, family run Mediterranean restaurant in the heart of the Granite City.
Enjoy a step back to the fifties style trattoria with cosy alcoves, rough walls and picture after picture of the beautiful Sicilian coast.
Come and visit us 7 days a week, for business lunches, private parties, intimate dinners or for a quick bite before the theatre.
Our menus are also ideal for more casual dining or if you just fancy a treat!
Take a step into the warm embrace of the Mediterranean and let us do all the work for you.”

Rusticos Website

Tripadvisor review

Aberdeen Pubs and Bars 17: Dusk

Dusk Bar

“Located in the heart of Aberdeen city centre on Langstane Place Dusk cocktail bar offers a unique drinking experience for those wishing to enjoy quality products in stylish surroundings.
Dusk specialise in serving a wonderfully diverse range of cocktails.”

Dusk Facebook Page

Tripadvisor Review

Aberdeen Restaurants: Foodstory

“Foodstory are a group of people who, in 2013, launched a kickstarter with a dream of building a space where anyone of any age, any walk of life of life could not just eat great, healthy food but could go and feel part of a community through art and music. They believe in bringing people together. They built the cafe themselves, and most of the furniture was donated or built from salvaged parts, so the shelves are a bit wonky, the chairs are odd, and their ageing, yet beautiful-sounding Monington & Weston piano was left to them by one of the founders, Sandy’s late grandfather. You can play it if you like.
From morning to evening, Foodstory serve healthy, locally-sourced food for all dietary requirements, brew tasty tasty coffee, and stage regular events to give people a chance to get together and have fun. Since the very beginning, they have worked passionately to employ staff who share not only a passion for healthy food and great coffee, but also the love of bringing people together.
Foodstory think that Aberdeen is a great city with amazing people in it and wanted to create a space that the city is proud of for many years. They want to serve less meat in the cafe as they feel that focusing on a more veggie diet is friendlier to our planet. Using a lot of organic vegetables and food in their dishes and mostly local cheeses, eggs, chutneys, jams; they make everything else themselves- soups, hot pots, dips, salads, cakes etc. Foodstory want you to feel inspired and feel good when you eat in the café.”

VisitAberdeenshire

Foodstory website

Tripadvisor Review

10 Places to visit in Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire

From the VisitAberdeenshire blog

“Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire is well known for its granite buildings and sea transports links, but it also has a thriving arts and culture scene in addition to a rich and colourful history. Long sandy beaches lay adjacent to quaint fishing villages, city parks are nestled among some of the oldest buildings and structures in the UK.
The region is home to world famous food, showcased through Michelin Guide restaurants just a short stroll from medieval castles and local ice cream producers like Mackie’s of Scotland putting North-east Scotland on the map as a top foodie destination.” 

VisitAberdeenshire blog

Aberdeen Pubs and Bars 16: Old Blackfriars

Old Blackfriars

“The cobbled pedestrian area outside Old Blackfriars was used to hold public executions and it is the site where people rose up against the English garrison in Aberdeen’ castle and using the password ‘Bon Accord’ began the destruction of the castle.
Today Bon Accord is the City’s motto. Across the road, the Tollbooth has been the site of civic administration since 1398.

The site of pub was owned by Dominican monks, known as Blackfriars, and the stained glass and pews were taken from a local chapel and provide a suitable atmosphere for this 350 year old building. That’s why the moment you enter this atmospheric pub, it’s like stepping back in time. With its two levels, low-beamed ceiling and ecclesiastical fittings, it makes you feel as if you’re sitting alongside several centuries of drinkers.
The pub has an extensive menu of freshly prepared food, which is available all day and is loved by locals, families, shoppers, real ale drinkers, tourists and, allegedly a ghost or two! With its no television policy, Old Blackfriars knows exactly what makes a traditional pub tick. Look out for the Tuesday quiz and the Thursday Scottish music jam sessions as well as the changing line-up of real ales and the impressive malt.”

A Story to Tell: Scotlands Pubs and Bars

Tripadvisor Review

Video of the Day

29th June 2019

Aberdeen Pubs and Bars 15: Grape and Grain

Grape and Grain

“A visit to Grape and Grain the new addition to Aberdeen’s bar scene, confirms why it has become an instant success. Based on Thistle Street it is, quite simply, a haven of elegance and quiet sophistication.
Warm and welcoming, stylish and subtle, relaxing and refined, Grape and Grain is a place to unwind, meet up with friends or catch up with clients to discuss business in an informal atmosphere away from the office; at Grape But what really sets Grape and Grain apart is what is contained behind the bar. Here you’ll find a superior selection of wines, craft beers and spirits. A range of more than 40 fine wines supplied exclusively in Aberdeen to Grape and Grain by the award-winning Berkmann Wine Cellars and glasses of champagne come from the house of Laurent-Perrier.
If you favour the grain over the grape you will find a selection of some of the finest craft beers brewed in Scotland and an extensive range of Scottish botanical gins and whiskies. Grape and Grain is not a restaurant but that’s not say you won’t have a chance to sample a selection of local fare. Scottish oatcakes, cheeses, chutneys and fruit available on the cheese slates and the charcuterie is second to none with rich venison salami to mention just one of the offerings accompanied with some beetroot and chilli relish all locally sourced. Of course, with the CEO of an IT company in charge, the very latest in technology is available at your fingertips with superfast broadband and perhaps that “destination experience” goes just one step further as each of the semi-circular pods features a table with integral charging points for smartphones. Grape and Grain should certainly be on your radar when looking for something rather exciting and very different. and Grain mixing business with pleasure comes naturally.”

Grape and Grain Facebook Page

Tripadvisor Review

Further Afield: Skara Brae, Orkney

Skara Brae

The Neolithic settlement of Skara Brae is one of the best preserved groups of prehistoric houses in Western Europe. It gives a remarkable picture of life 5,000 years ago, before Stonehenge was built.

The Neolithic village of Skara Brae was discovered in the winter of 1850. Wild storms ripped the grass from a high dune known as Skara Brae, beside the Bay of Skaill, and exposed an immense midden (refuse heap) and the ruins of ancient stone buildings. The discovery proved to be the best-preserved Neolithic village in northern Europe. And so it remains today.
Skara Brae was inhabited before the Egyptian pyramids were built, and flourished for centuries before construction began at Stonehenge. It is some 5,000 years old. But it is not its age alone that makes it so remarkable and so important. It is the degree to which it has been preserved. The structures of this semi-subterranean village survive in impressive condition. So, amazingly, does the furniture in the village houses. Nowhere else in northern Europe are we able to see such rich evidence of how our remote ancestors actually lived.
The profound importance of this remarkable site was given official recognition in 1999 when it was inscribed upon the World Heritage List as part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

All the houses are well-built of closely-fitting flat stone slabs. They were set into large mounds of midden (household refuse) and linked by covered passages. Each house comprised a single room with a floor space of roughly 40sq m. The ‘fitted’ stone furniture within each room comprised a dresser, where prized objects were probably stored and displayed, two box-beds, a hearth centrally placed and small tanks set into the floor, perhaps for preparing fish bait.

A rich array of artefacts and ecofacts has been discovered during the various archaeological excavations. They include gaming dice, hand tools, pottery and jewellery (necklaces, beads, pendants and pins). Most remarkable are the richly carved stone objects, perhaps used in religious rituals. The villagers were farmers, hunters and fishermen, capable of producing items of beauty and sophistication with rudimentary technology. No weapons have been found and the settlement was not in a readily defended location, suggesting a peaceful life.
Most of the artefacts are now on view in the visitor centre, a short walk away.

Village life appears to have ended around 2,500 BC. No one knows why. Some argue that it was because a huge sandstorm engulfed their houses, others that it was more gradual. As village life came to an end, new monuments were beginning to rise up on mainland Orkney, including most importantly the chambered tomb at Maes Howe and the impressive stone circles at the Ring of Brodgar and Stenness.isitors can explore this prehistoric village and see ancient homes fitted with stone beds, dressers and seats. A replica house allows visitors to explore its interior, while the visitor centre provides touch-screen presentations, fact-finding quizzes and an opportunity to see artefacts discovered during the archaeological excavations of the 1970s.

VisitScotland

Skara Brae Wikipedia page

Skara Brae – The Discovery and Excavation of Orkney’s finest Neolithic sites

Skara Brae at Historic Environment Scotland

Picture of the Day

25th June 2019

Dunnottar Castle, Stonehaven